Discuss

Category Archives: Social Media

Enform E-Commerce Integration

By | Announcements, Automotive, eBay, ecommerce, Google, Industry, Instagram, SEO, Social Media, tools, Web Store | No Comments

Enform Specialises in eCommerce

 

Enform enable Online Retailers to build and grow marketplaces, audiences and advertising reach. Utilising knowledge and experience we work with you to build a multi-channel, multi-market business that integrates with your systems to provide scalable options.

With each business utilising different systems to deliver pricing, inventory and rich content for their listings – virtually every integration is a bespoke development that needs proper planning and management to ensure economic and efficient delivery. Read More

Six SEO Tips for 2016

By | Blog, SEO, Social Media | No Comments

SEO Tips

With the very fast and frequent changes in Google’s search algorithms doing SEO is not what it used to be. What were cardinal rules for basic SEO a few years ago barely remain effective today for getting your website to the first page of a Google search, much less to the top of the results. Since the rules have changed, how you do SEO should change too.

Read More

Facebook’s new ‘friends & family first’ algorithm: What businesses should know

By | Announcements, Facebook, Social Media | No Comments

facebookchanges

Facebook once again tweaks its news feed algorithm (see this post for a history of Facebook algorithm and other changes). This time, it’s ‘friends and family first’ – what’s being shared from friends and family will now be prioritised over posts shared by business and news media pages, rendering them less prominent or less visible to Facebook users.

This will lessen traffic to many business and news media sites that are dependent on sharing articles in their Facebook pages.

Read More

Why Facebook surpassed Google in Media Referral Traffic

By | Comment, SEO, Social Media | No Comments

1 Google

 

image source: Parse.ly Quarterly Authority Report

Facebook shoots up

In August, the news that Facebook overtook Google in referral traffic, for the second time in less than a year, exploded among SEO sites. This is according to a report by content analytics service, Parse.ly

Headlines blared:

For Major Publishers, Facebook Referral Traffic Passes Google Again” —Marketing Land

Facebook has taken over from Google as a traffic source for news” —Fortune

Facebook, Not Google, Is Now the Top Referral Source for Digital Publishers” —Adweek

Facebook Passes Google In Referral Traffic” —MediaPost

Facebook is now more important than Google for online publishers” —Business Insider

Read More

A Breakdown of What Exactly Happens During an ‘Unsubscribe’

By | Automailer, Blog, ecommerce, eDM, Research, Social Media | No Comments

Social_email_marketing_flat

In your email marketing campaigns, each message you send should come with a facility allowing readers to unsubscribe from receiving any future emails. Even if you don’t add an unsubscribe link yourself (which is a bad idea), one will automatically be added.

However, have you ever wondered just how exactly that link works? And more importantly, what happens to people who have unsubscribed, and is there a way to get them back? If you have multiple lists, how do you ensure that they only get unsubscribed from a particular list and not every list in your account?

Enform’s Automailer naturally comes with this functionality (an unsubscribe tag) whether it’s in the HTML page, template, or plain text version. Upon sending your campaign to your subscribers, each reader receives a copy of your email, with the tag automatically replaced with a unique link for each subscriber.

Each link is unique to each person and each email marketing campaign, so it’s not just a matter of copying an old unsubscribe and pasting it into your next email.

A Look at What Happens When a Subscriber Clicks on the Unsubscribe Link

Upon clicking the unsubscribe link, the user is directed to our Automailer system, which records the click and automatically recognises the subscriber and his/her corresponding email list and campaign.

Enform’s Automailer instantly unsubscribes users from your email list, with no need for you to manually change any settings on the program. Your campaign report will now show that user as having unsubscribed from receiving future emails.

The Suppression List – Ways to Manage Multiple Lists and Not Lose Subscribers

The default unsubscribe setting on our Automailer automatically removes an address from all listings in the same account. This means that if the unsubscribed address were in your ‘customers’ list and ‘newsletter’ list, it would be removed from both. We’ve also made steps to ensure that you don’t accidentally import an unsubscribed email address back into your account. Addresses that have unsubscribed from your campaign are immediately added to your suppression list.

However a unique feature of Automailer allows you to change your unsubscribe setting for your lists; this is extremely useful if you want the unsubscribe link to only remove users from the specific list their emails came from but leave them on other lists in your account. A great feature that ensures you don’t lose subscribers by a blanket suppression across all lists.

Once Unsubscribed, is a User Blocked Forever?

Former subscribers can re-subscribe at any time through your subscribe forms; only you are prevented from reimporting an address once it’s in the suppression list.

How do you Keep Users from Unsubscribing from your Lists?

There’s no foolproof way of keeping your database of subscribers 100% intact, but what you can do is make a compelling case for subscribers to stay, right at the unsubscribe page.

Take for instance, the unsubscribe page of Lazada.com, a major e-commerce player in Asia. Upon clicking the unsubscribe link, you’re presented with different options to better control the mail you receive.

better control the mail you receive

The options above are particularly useful for several subscribers annoyed with the flood of emails they’re getting, so giving them some kind of control over their messages increases the likelihood of them staying.

Tips on Leveraging Social Proof to Get Subscribers & Customers

By | Blog, Research, Social Media | No Comments

social-proof

When was the last time you gave away your email address online? Was there any reluctance in handing it over?

Most internet users tend to protect their email addresses in fear of receiving too many promotional emails they’re not really interested in. Obviously, this is a problem for marketers who want to use email subscribers to grow their business.

But what if there was a way to beat this natural fear?

We believe the answer is social proof.

Social Proof in a Nutshell

Social proof is defined as a psychological phenomenon where people follow the actions of others in order to conform. In other words, it’s people doing things they see other people are doing.

The Wall Street Journal recently published a study aimed at understanding the effects of social proof in consumer behaviour. In it, researchers sought to find out whether social proof was a more powerful motivator than saving money or protecting the environment. They tested four different messages to convince respondents to use electric fans over air conditioning.

The first message told the customer they could save up to $54 a month on electricity.

The second message told the customer they could help save the environment by eliminating up to 262 pounds in greenhouse gases.

The third message tried to convince customers by reminding them saving energy was being social responsible.

The fourth message told customers that 77 percent of their neighbours were using fans to save energy.

As you may have guessed, the fourth message, the one that appealed to positive social proof, was most effective. In this instance, positive social proof proved to be more convincing than saving money, saving the environment, and being social responsible.

How do you use social proof in email marketing?

It’s doesn’t take much, to be honest; just use a simple reinterpretation of the examples by the study above.

1. Show proof of subscriber numbers

Showing the number of subscribers to your email list lets potential customers know that it’s common behaviour for other people to sign up, and more importantly, that it’s relatively safe. Simply adding a subscriber count mechanism to your opt-in forms allows you to tap into the desire of readers to do what others are doing, thus driving email subscribes.

You can also make your calls to action more relatable. Statements like, “Be part of a network of sales professionals 15,000 strong and growing receiving our weekly newsletter,” speaks to a reader’s impulse to join in on the action and see what he is missing out on.

2. Use testimonials from influential figures

If you’re lucky enough to have connections with influencers in your industry, then by all means, do everything you can to get a testimonial from them about your email list. These figures act as endorsers, reassuring readers that “Hey, you should sign up too!”

It’s one of the oldest tricks in the book. People want to look up to industry influencers because they want to achieve the same success.

How do you use social proof to increase email conversions?

With your email list already built thanks to social proof, you can then move to the next step: conversions. Fortunately, social proof can work here too, and again, all it takes is a little tweaking of the examples mentioned previously.

1. Show off your number of customers

Again, people want a sense of security knowing that other customers have already bought your product or paid for your service. When sending a product-related email encouraging people to purchase, include how many people have bought the same product or service and you’re bound to drive conversions.

The key here is to trigger a fear in missing out in an offer that others have signed up for or purchased. Part of it is curiosity, but a greater part of it is knowing that something, your product, must be worth paying for since many people have done so.

2. Highlight reviews

Reviews are perhaps the most influential factor in shaping a purchase decision, so you definitely want to leverage positive reviews of your products. Include positive, concise, but brief reviews of your products/services in newsletters, and you’re  guaranteed to see an increase in conversions sooner or later.

A Warning

Of course, all of these tips boil down to transparency. If you make things up just to leverage the advantages of social proof, you run the risk of things blowing up in your face, and your reputation forever tainted.

Amazon Outs Online Marketing Platform to Rival Google AdWords

By | Announcements, Blog, Comment, ecommerce, Research, Social Media | No Comments

Google-Amazon

Several reports claim that the company is aiming to give Google some competition in the highly lucrative online marketing landscape with their proprietary ad platform. Word is that Amazon’s advertising product will be similar to Google AdWords in how it works, and will replace its own online ads and compete for ad share.

If successful, Amazon could very well shrink Google’s monopoly on online share once they replace their ads with their own. And the market is tempting for any tech company out there, what with more than $50 billion in sales a year.

Amazon’s new project will be called Amazon Sponsored Links, with no confirmation yet on when publishers and advertisers can try the platform out.

Furthermore, Amazon is busy developing a bulk-buying program for advertisers, which would enable the online retail giant to place ads on third party sites more easily. Reports by the Wall Street Journal indicate that Amazon’s online marketing system will roll out to users before the year ends, with the company already pitching ideas to prospective clients.

Needless to say, Amazon has their work cut out for them, should they choose to push through with their own platform against Google. The search engine giant didn’t just dominate the online marketing space overnight. It built its way from the ground up, boasting of more than 14 years of experience and along the way, amassing millions of advertisers and publishers vying for the limited ad space available to their respective niches.

This level of competition has not surprisingly sent prices for ad space soaring, which also means publishers are likely to stick with Google over another online marketing firm.

Although Google has yet to see another online marketing platform capable of toppling them from the top spot, Amazon certainly has a chance of being the company to do it. With the company’s strong experience and leadership in the online retail industry, Amazon has firsthand knowledge about the purchasing habits and behaviour of online shoppers—it’s this area where Google is at a potential disadvantage.

Moreover, Amazon apparently already has more than 250 million users actively using their platform, potentially giving the company plenty of data they could use to push their online marketing platform and rival Googles AdWords program. If the company makes the right moves, we at Enform could see a new player entering the online marketing space.

Of course, we’ve seen many companies out there introduce their own online marketing platforms as an alternative to AdWords with varying degrees of success. All of them, however, have fallen short to knocking Google off their perch.

We’ll have to wait and see if Amazon has the goods to make a strong entry into the online marketing scene. Anything less than spectacular might only result in failure.

Auto Parts Aftermarket Online, e-Commerce and all that PART 1: What’s it all about and why should I care?

By | Automotive, Blog, ecommerce, Research, Social Media, Uncategorized | No Comments

Reprinted from Undercar Review magazine – April 2014 issue 

By Jim Gurieff of PARts Australia www.partsdb.com.au

PART 1: What’s it all about and why should I care?

In 1997 the Australian new vehicle market was around 650,000 units and of that, Falcon and Commodore platforms accounted for over 200,000 or 30% of the total new cars sold.

Jump to 2013 and the number of new cars sold was over 1.13 million and of that, less than 70,000 were Commodore or Falcon based.

Meanwhile, the AAAA reports as part of its latest industry report – “Workshops and repairers crave an integrated vehicle and product fitment lookup with VIN and service data as part of a point-of-sale solution.”

With over 200 unique new models added to the Australian market in 2013 we now have one of the most diverse vehicle markets in the world spread over a relatively small volume base. With the demise of local manufacturing and an inevitable pure import market the industry has to adjust to knowing more about more vehicles at an increasing rate.

At the same time, the range of product available today is more diverse than ever before so accurate and timely service and product information is even more important.

Customers Looking For Outcomes

To add another layer of complexity, our customers are using the web more and more for product reviews, service information and price shopping for products and services while increasingly demanding of the way in which this information is provided. I want it now and when  it suits me.

So back to the question, why should I and the undercar industry care?

Because every industry needs to adapt to the changing environment and the connected digital world is accelerating the rate of change.

We are product and service providers and we need to remember that the end user customer or consumer is actually looking for outcomes and not just parts or service. They are most often driven by the need to repair a fault, pass registration, upgrade their vehicle or any number of other actual outcomes.

It’s rare that a vehicle owner wakes up one day and thinks that replacing their muffler would be a good thing to do that day. So when they do think about the problem, potential outcome and solution, all the industry players need to be ready to provide the answers and solution.

In simple terms, it’s about giving the customer what they want. A simple enough statement but not always considered by some in the aftermarket parts industry.

The following has been put together in conjunction with one of our digital and online specialist marketing partners, Enform Networks. This 2-part summary pulls together research, advice and case studies from various sources to help explain the current environment and the where the market might be headed.

The last few years have seen an explosion in online retail sales of auto parts. Major players like Amazon and eBay are enjoying  significant growth in many sectors of online retail sales and that clearly includes auto parts and related products. IBlSWorld reports a 13.3% annualised growth in Australian online automotive parts and accessories sales between 2008 to 2013 while US numbers are even stronger.

Clearly we are seeing a migration toward online fulfilment of retail consumer demand while trade and reseller purchases are moving toward closed user group solutions offered by the industry wholesalers and their business-to-business (B2B) portals. Many of the same wholesalers are also offering retail solutions to complement existing bricks-and-mortar or physical services with many more building virtual stores and online outlets that often exceed the service delivery offer available through their retail store fronts, try free shipping direct to the customer’s door!

Future projections are equally bullish with continuing double digit growth expected across all categories with reports specifically mentioning traditional “hard parts” categories including undercar brakes, shocks and suspension.

So it’s not just “S & G” lines (as the hard parts purists sometimes call accessories) but all manner of parts. This is an important misconception that poses one of the biggest threats to traditional parts sales and service thinking and is just one area of Significant risk to parts suppliers and sellers.

Along with our online specialist partners, we try to help our clients adapt to the changing nature of customer expectations and their channel preferences because after all, it’s about giving the customer what they want and also where they want it.

It’s natural to resist change. This applies to every level of the distribution chain and across all industries but some businesses are more resistant than others.

The area of data standards is particularly tough as suppliers and sellers struggle to defend and justify their own carefully cultivated data silos. Having worked in the aftermarket for a few decades, I’ve seen the changes to fitment cataloguing and product data creation and management.

Once the digital age picked up speed in the ’90s, we saw the beginning of the age of data-divergence as more and more suppliers and sellers built their own data solutions imagining that this would somehow provide a significant and durable commercial edge. In many cases it did and some of these are still working well however for many others, it proved to be a distraction and a costly diversion from the core business of making, selling and servicing parts.

Parts

After all, how many different versions of a Commodore VT 6 cylinder sedan data record do we really need?

The ’00s saw a maturing of the discreet data silo model as more and more sellers realised that having “another industry standard” that their suppliers would need to contribute to was actually working against them both in terms of cost and support. Meanwhile, the European parts suppliers created the Tee Doc industry standard (as one example) and the AAIA in the US launched the ACES/PIES system to help their industry.

The last few years have seen an acceleration towards standardisation with more and more suppliers and sellers adopting some sort of standard, a time of data-convergence. This is good news for both the industry and consumer and helps the aftermarket compete better while supporting the aims of programs like the AAAA Choice of Repairer campaign.Which leads us back to the real point and reason for the automotive parts aftermarket, selling more aftermarket products to auto parts consumers!

Online channels are not a silver bullet to rescue flagging sales. It’s a different way to market and requires different skills and resources and doesn’t suit all types of products. However, according to the National Australia Bank, the value of annualised online retail sales for the 12 months to end February 2013 was $13.1 billion or 5.9% of all retail spending with a year-on-year growth of 19%.

If you don’t have an online strategy or your strategy is not delivering that sort of growth rate, you’re falling behind. Embrace the opportunity and make sure you’re visible where your customers are.

Next time we’ll look at some practical ideas, suggestions and case studies to help you think about a strategy that suits you.

Auto Parts Aftermarket Online, e-Commerce and all that PART 2: What are my options?

By | Automotive, Blog, ecommerce, Research, Social Media, Uncategorized | No Comments

Reprinted from Undercar Review magazine – June 2014 issue 

By Jim Gurieff of PARts Australia www.partsdb.com.au

Part 1 of this article appeared in the April 2014 issue of Undercar Review. In part 2 we follow on with this topic and look at the “how” and “what” side assuming we now have an answer to “why should I care”. That is, assuming online and e-commerce is important to me, what are my options and how can I deploy them?

So assuming that we’re talking about solutions and strategies using open solutions and standards, the following are some typical questions and answers to help guide you to the right decision for your business.

The reason why open standards are mentioned is that the last thing you should be doing is looking at custom data or technology solutions that leave you with something unique. Imagine building your own accounting software, word processor or worst still, creating your own vehicle table that you had to maintain?

Who is my customer – B2B, B2C or both?
Business to business (B2B) means selling to others in the industry like a reseller store, workshop or garage. Business to consumer (B2C) is essentially retail so think about who you want to target and find the right solution for each or both. Remember, a business will often start with B2B and then want to expand to B2C.

 

AFI PARts B2

An effective B2B site needs lots of information and options for trade customers.

What are my business goals or expectations for this project?
You wouldn’t launch a new service or product without some clear goals and sales expectations and you shouldn’t build an e-commerce solution without some goals and expectations of potential sales.

With that you can develop a realistic budget based on an acceptable return on investment projection. It will cost money and the cost will be proportionate to the goals and targets. See more below about time and resources.

Do I have the time and resources I need?
Just because Google doesn’t charge you to search and you can read a newspaper online for free (for the moment), don’t think that building an online e-commerce store is free or cheap. People think that because its digital or online, web stores or web sites are cheap.

point1image

Yes they are a lot cheaper to build and fit out than a physical bricks-and-mortar store but you can’t expect to build any new business channel, sales division or strategy without a realistic investment. Technology and systems cost money and the more “robotic” (not requiring human input) they are the dearer the initial setup cost.

It also takes time to build and deploy a successful online or e-commerce strategy just like any new sales channel, product or service.

Do I have the staff I need?
Building something that works for your business also takes some love and attention. You need someone that believes in the project to take ownership and to nurture and maintain it ongoing. Remember that a successful web store or e-commerce site is akin to a successful shop front or merchandising store which means a good merchant in charge. Be realistic and make sure you have that person or persons before you start,that they understand the technology, “get” the goals and are supported by the business.

Do I need to sell on eBay or Amazon?
Amazon is not offering online sales in Australia yet (apart from Kindle and niche items) but they will arrive eventually. Note that apart from tyre outlets, one of the biggest sellers of car tyres in the US is Amazon.

Meanwhile, eBay is already here and their Parts and Accessories marketplace is now in the top 3 sales channels for aftermarket retail sales.

If you need to sell to retail or B2C you need to consider these channels in your decision making and technology choices. Suppliers who want to maximise retail sales of their brands need to make sure their product and fitment data is optimised and available for your B2C reseller or retailer customers.

What are the key elements?
Data, technology and merchandising are 3 main element groups.

  1. Data means anything from product information, catalogue or fitment, images and video links to inventory and pricing data from your own systems. Fundamentally you need to be able to acquire, store and link product data to pricing and inventory data to sell the product successfully.
  2. Technology is about the data management and delivery tool. This would involve your ERP or point-of-sale system, a web site, an e-commerce store or web shop as well as any integration tools to link the data together or process payments. It’s a big area but getting the previous points clear in your head first will make it easier to get the right technology.
  3. Merchandising is THE most important element ongoing and is often the difference between adequate and acceptable sales performance. This includes presentation of the product, data, range, pricing, stocking policies but also promotions, SEO (search engine optimisation) and even copywriting. A good digital “merchant” is just as important as a good shopkeeper.

What data do I need?
Product or fitment data is the key thing. Our industry is a complex one and the product data requirements are amongst the most complex around. It’s not just about finding the right part for low cost of sales but also making sure it fits and doesn’t injure someone.

The right product data solution needs to do the job of a parts interpreter and using industry standards or global solutions supported by the suppliers themselves is key.

The data needs to be detailed and flexible enough to be deployed where the supplier and seller need it and in the appropriate format. Many potential sources exist so think twice (or preferably not at all) about building your own.

e-Comm or e-commerce data is the other side and typically involves pricing and inventory data from the seller’s side.

It would also include freight rates, weights and measures like dimensional data needed for shipping and could also include the suppliers own availability data for more complex solutions.

DB_Console_Monroe                               Good quality product and fitment data that’s easy to manage and distribute is critical to e-commerce

What technology should I use?
Answer – the right one. Over simplified but the truth if you’ve answered and considered the above and talked to people that work in this area about your specific needs.

Options will include subscribed product and fitment data solutions like TecDoc or ACES/PIES. Service and repair data from providers like Autodata, VIN decoding and vehicle parc data from a variety of local and global
sources.

In some cases you may need an integration solution like Flow for complex systems or multi-channel market listing tools for eBay and Amazon like Commerce Connect, Channel Advisor or Neto.

The later also have the advantage of linking to your own web store but that then also includes most of the popular web site content management systems like Joomla or Magento and the associated shopping cart or e-commerce plug-ins.

Most importantly these are known, off-the-shelf products and solutions that are all used in automotive aftermarket e-commerce.

This also includes products like PARts B2, an off-theshelf specialised B2B and B2C e-commerce engine that can be rented by the month and connected to a product and fitment database source.

However, if you feel you need to go it alone in this area, limit the custom solutions and use off the shelf for as much as you can.

What about 3PL?
Third Party Logistics is a growing service area where suppliers use dedicated warehouse and logistics providers to store, pick and pack your orders. This is a great boom for growing and emerging businesses that operate online as it removes the need for warehousing and related staff letting you concentrate on merchandising.

There are an increasing number of sellers that are also using a type of 3PL function to drop-ship orders direct from the supplier to the customer. Efficient wholesalers or suppliers love this sort of business as they can deploy many sellers to manage the sales coal-face while they get on with the job or making and or distributing product.

If I build it they will come, right?
Imagine building the world’s most comprehensive auto parts store but then locating it out the–back-of-Bourke?

No offence intended to our regional and country brothers but there aren’t that many potential customers out there to support your mega parts store let alone any passing traffic.

Building a new store in the city needs an advertising and promotion strategy to get people to come and buy and an online web store is even more demanding as every new store may as well be out in the desert without some sort of promotion and marketing.

A big physical store front at least has some presence to passers-by whereas the biggest web store in the world is invisible unless it appears in search engines, is promoted via direct mail, with advertising both online and in the real world.

Needless to say this is an oversimplification and should be used as a guide to help you get started. It may seem too complex already but with the right answers and support from the right people it’s relatively straightforward to get a solution that suits you.

Most importantly, it’s not too hard and it should be a core part of your business in the current commercial environment.

Next time we will look at a couple of specific case studies from a B2B and B2C side.

How to Tell Web Navigation and Information Architecture Apart

By | Blog, Social Media, Web Design, Web Store | No Comments

People in web design and development know that navigation design and information architecture (IA) concepts go hand in hand. In particular, IA is used to feed information towards usable navigation design.

Still, they are not the same. In fact, the reach of information architecture goes far beyond website navigation, which has been described as being only the tip of the iceberg that rests atop the site’s information architecture.

Information Architecture Defined

A site’s information architecture consists of two major components.

  1. The identification and definition of the site’s content and its functionality
  2. The basic organisation, structure, and classifications that define the connections between a site’s content and functionality

When you view a website, you’re not really seeing its information architecture (IA). Instead, IA informs the user interface, the part of the site you interact with. The IA is documented in diagrams and spreadsheets, not in prototypes, comprehensive layouts, or wireframes.

example of an information architecture site map

Here is an example of an information architecture site map by the Nielsen/Norman Group’s (NN/g) website. The blue nodes show tier-one information objects, while green nodes show tier-two objects, and tier-three objects are shown in yellow. 

While IA itself may not be visible to users, it definitely has a crucial impact on the site’s User Experience (UX), defined as the totality of everything the user encounters while on a website. However, users will feel  the structure of the site, depending on how its content is divided and connected in ways that meet their needs.

Website Navigation Defined

A website’s navigation is comprised of several user interface components. Navigation is designed to help users locate information and functionality, hopefully leading them towards favourable actions. Main components of navigation include local navigation, global navigation, utility navigation, facets, filters, footers, related links, and more.

example of navigation components

Examples of navigation components shown above

Some decisions have to be made when thinking of each navigation component. For instance, when usage priority is concerned, you need to ask yourself how much users depend on a particular navigation component. Placement is also another factor, calling for answers on which pages a navigation component should be present in. Lastly, the pattern is a factor that calls for questions on which navigation design patterns best support discoverability, whether it’s carousels, megamenus, or more.

IA and Navigation Relationships

The mistake many designers make when building a site is that they ignore IA and focus only on navigation. Doing so is inefficient, not to mention dangerous. Navigation that fails to address the full scope of content and functionality of a site can be a costly mistake.

For instance, imagine a design team opting to use the common inverted-L style navigation consisting of a top navigation bar and a left navigation rail, because they like how it looks. This template can be used on sites that have no more than 4 tiers, so you can only imagine the headache the design team has when they realise later on during a site inventory that many parts of the site will be more than 4 tiers deep.

IA First Before Designing Navigation

That being said, it’s important for designers to first define or redefine the site’s IA before even thinking of a design project. While it’s true that the IA has to be flexible to accommodate new information, it doesn’t have to be final before wireframing and prototyping—a first pass is enough to get an idea of the volume and complexity of the content.  Making choices on your navigation components based on appearances alone can force you to remodel your IA, or cram too much information in a navigation component, ending up in your website failing to accommodate the needs of users.