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Power Retail Talks to MotoParts About Auto Parts E-tailing

By | Automotive, Blog, ecommerce, Industry, Research, Web Design, Web Store | No Comments
MotoParts-266x266

Selling automotive parts online has proved challenging for MotoParts, but developing a parts-centric approach has helped the company progress. Power Retail chats to MotoParts’ Scott Shillinglaw to find out more.

With a long history in the B2B commerce space supplying wholesale auto parts throughout NSW and Australia, MotoParts decided to launch into a completely new sales channel to leverage their existing business model. As one of the largest online marketplaces, eBay was the obvious choice for MotoParts to start their online presence and drive a whole new section of growth for the business.

This decision was prompted by the rapid growth of the Australian online automotive parts sales industry (estimated to be worth $380.3 million in 2014-2015 and growing annually at a compounded rate of 17 percent) centred on New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland – areas that have the highest number of kilometres driven.

Power Retail magazine caught up with Scott Shillinglaw, Online Director for MotoParts, to see how the transition came about and how they used PARts Australia for data and technology.

Read more about MotoParts’ Parts-Centric Approach using PARts.

Enform Automailer Rolls Out Email Automation

By | Announcements, Automailer, Blog, eDM, tools | No Comments
Enform Automailer Rolls Out Email Automation
Enform are excited to unveil a new update to our Automailer program! First things first.
We are officially rolling out Email Automation to all of our Automailer users. We’ve long incorporated Autoresponders into our email direct marketing client, but this time, we’re adding more features and turning it into a core feature of the application.
Automailer’s new Automation feature allows users to build workflows to send their email message to the right person, at exactly the right time. You can now automate emails according to specific factors, such as a user joining your email list, a specific time and date, an anniversary of a particular date (like an annual promotion), updates on your blog or website, and much more.
When logging in to Automailer after the update, you’ll see the new tab for the feature, as well as a welcome message bringing you up to speed on the features and controls to automate your emails. We at Enform are really excited about this new feature since it’s a big step towards answering our customers’ requests for more comprehensive email automaton features.
While waiting for the new Automailer Automation feature, we’ve put together a list of FAQs, paired with their corresponding answers.
Frequently Asked Questions
When will Automation be Available?
The product will be out very soon. We will only release the feature only when it’s completely perfect.
How are Automation and Autoresponders Different?
This update takes the great functionality of RSS-to-email and Autoresponder, combining them under the new Automation. If you’ve built previous workflows on RSS-to-email or autoresponders, you will find all these will still work in Automation—you can continue to make more similar workflows after the update.
What’s unique about the RSS to email functionality?
Although all future RSS-to-email campaigns will be done using the Automation tab, the way users create campaigns will still be the same. We’ve only made it more convenient for you to created automation workflows, bringing them together in one single feature and location.
Not familiar with our Automailer eDM solution and want to find out more call us 02 8999 1900 or click here to contact us.

Google Search – Is Your Website Mobilegeddon Ready?

By | Blog, Comment, ecommerce, Mobile, Research, SEO, tools | No Comments

Google Algorithm Update

Come 21st of April, Google will roll out its new “Mobile Friendly” algorithm update which will preference search results for web sites that are mobile friendly.

For your websites, this simply means you’ll get left out in mobile search results unless your website is deemed by Google bots to be mobile friendly.

But wait!

How should you know if my site is ready for mobilegeddon? Fortunately Google, being Google, has already foreseen the outcry of website owners if they opted to bring their algorithm guessing game to such an important update so they’ve actually rolled out more than enough tools to help you prepare for this big day.

Without further delay, here are the tools and information you’ll need to be able to do a self-diagnosis of your site in preparation for mobilegeddon:

  1. Mobile-Friendly Test – just simply put in your website URL and hit analyze and you’ll know within seconds if your site is up to speed. Hopefully you’ll get a result like so:Mobile-Friendly Test
  2. Google Webmaster Tools Mobile Usability Report – This is another tool that will help webmasters identify elements of your website that does not fit Google’s mobile friendly standards, because it could be that some NOT ALL your pages have problems. Errors here should be addressed if you want to keep up on mobile search results.Here’s an example result for good measure:Mobile Usability
  3. Mobile Friendly Guidelines – In the case you’ll find yourself in the undesirable side of this update, after using the previously mentioned tools, fret not as here’s all you need to be able to get back in the good light of Google mobile search results.

Remember, this is not just about penalties but also about rewards. A more mobile friendly web site will be rewarded as much as a non-mobile site is penalised.

And as always, if you need help in keeping up with all these changes, don’t hesitate to get in touch with us any time.

Google Looking to Rank Websites by Facts Instead of Links

By | Blog, Research, SEO | No Comments
google
Photo Credit: Wired.com
It’s no secret that the Internet, while an incredible source of information about pretty much anything, is also filled to the brim with garbage. Anti-vaccination websites making dubious claims backed by anecdotes are on the front page of Google’s search engine results pages, and sites claiming to “news sources” are everywhere, gathering a substantial audience despite citing very few facts.
In response to this problem, Google is considering a new algorithm that grades the trustworthiness of a website or page, considering this factor when ranking it for a particular keyword. In other words, the search giant is looking at grading sites by facts, and not just links.
The Problem with the Status Quo
When you want accurate information about something, you might have read about, or heard of, what do you do? The library used to be the safest choice, as most books that made their way there often had to meet stringent standards for factuality and accuracy.
These days though, people are more likely to Google their questions.
However, just because Google leads you to what it thinks are the answers to your questions, doesn’t mean they’re the right answers. And the problem is more prevalent than you think, as Google currently factors in the number of incoming links a web page has, using it as the basis for quality and ranking on its search results. Simply put, the more sites linking to a webpage, the higher Google ranks it.
But Google’s current search engine is far from perfect, with many websites having little to no facts at all managing to rise up the rankings. After all, just because several people are linking to website, thinking the information found there is valuable, doesn’t mean the information is based on facts. Case in point: gossip websites and their loose definition of facts.
The Solution
To avoid this rampant hijacking of real estate on search engine results, a team of Google researchers has created what it calls a “Knowledge-based Trust” algorithm that uses factual accuracy to rank websites instead of popularity. The challenge to making the algorithm work, is figuring out what information on a website is factual, and what isn’t.
How it Works
The system, which is still in the experimental stage, computes the number of inaccurate facts in a single web page, with a source having few inaccurate facts seen as more trustworthy. This computation results in what the team calls a Knowledge-Based Trust score. To make the algorithm work, the team uses Google’s proprietary Knowledge Vault, a massive vault of facts collected from the Internet.
The Knowledge Vault works by sniffing for information that matches a pattern Google calls “triples,” which meet the following 3 factors:
  • A subject that’s a real-world entity
  • A description of some characteristic of said entity
  • An object that shows the value of said characteristic
Here’s a real world example:
President Obama (the real-world subject entity), is the incumbent president (predicate) of America (object).
Google’s Knowledge Vault houses billions, if not trillions, of triples gathered from the Internet, with the Knowledge-based Trust algorithm using the vault to determine whether facts on a web page are true or not.
This reinforces the value of quality, factual data for website owners about the products and services they are offering.
Need help with content? Contact the team at Enform.

Questions To Answer When Designing Website Navigation

By | Blog, ecommerce, Mobile, Research, Web Design, Web Store | No Comments

Organising content for a website calls for designers to ask key questions on their planned Information Architecture (IA). Usability experts the Nielsen Norman Group (NN/g) broke down these problems, providing answers to the 3 most persistent questions many designers today struggle with when building sites.

How Many Categories do you Need?

The general rule of thumb is to have enough categories to show all the information offered on your site or app. However, what’s considered ‘enough’ will greatly depend on the content and intention of a site.

Most simple sites with a small range of content will usually do fine with a few categories. This minimalist approach helps users find the information they want as quickly as possible. Take for instance, Dyson’s website for their Airblade line of products (the Dyson Airblade is the company’s take on the quick hand dryer). The entire website has a solid IA scheme since all variations of the Airblade fit into 5 categories.

Dyson airblade homepage

Dyson Airblade Homepage

At the other end of the spectrum is RestroomDirect, a site that also sells hand dryers as well as a bunch of other fixtures for public bathrooms. Condensing all information on the site down to 5 categories makes it difficult for customers to find information on the company’s full range of products, which is why the site features 7 links in the top horizontal navigation, and 17 product categories in the vertical navigation. This combination allows users to easily access all relevant information on the site as efficiently as possible.

Restroom Direct

www.RestroomDirect.com

Both examples show the basic principle behind determining the appropriate number of categories in a website: go with what makes it easiest for users to access the information they need; don’t box yourself in by trying to hit a predetermined number.

Should you List Categories in Alphabetical Order?

Organising categories by a certain order is another issue frequently tackled by designers, many of whom feel that sorting categories alphabetically makes the most sense.

Unfortunately, there’s no one-size-fits-all approach to this problem, but what you can do is consider the following factors:

  1. What organising principle would be more meaningful than sorting alphabetically?
  2. Will visitors be familiar with the category names
  3. How many categories do you have?

More Meaningful Organising Principles

One approach that makes more sense than alphabetical organisation is frequency of use, which helps the majority of visitors on a site access the information they’re most likely looking for.

An example of this can be found on RightMove.co.uk, a property listing that has the categories For Sale and To Rent as the first two items in the navigation panel. This setup saves users a tremendous amount of time, since it makes sense to highlight content users are most likely to click on.

Rightmove

If you were to organise categories on this site alphabetically, you would get the unintuitive result below.

Rightmove labels

Standard Labels

However, there are instances when alphabetical organisation is more efficient. If you have categories under just one label (e.g. product names or brand names), users naturally look for information they know, like a particular word—alphabetical organisation is more helpful in this situation.

Do you Need Hover Menus with Touch Devices

With the advent of mobile devices that rely on touch interfaces, UX designers are wondering whether sites should still have hover nav menus.

Hover activated menus are unwieldy for touchscreen users. Even with menus adapted for use with a tap instead of a hover, touchscreens are just too small to display an entire menu. This can result in problems scrolling the menu without deactivating it by touch something else on the page.

However, just because a part of your audience can’t use this feature, doesn’t mean you should withhold it from everyone else. Hover activated menus are still easy to use on conventional desktop interfaces.

The key here is graceful degradation: ensure that customers who can’t use hover activation still have a means of accessing your content. A good example of this setup can be found on the Fedex website, which provides both hover and tap options for all their users, whether on traditional desktop interfaces or touchscreens.

Fedex

The full Fedex website has hover-activated menus

Fedex mobile version

The mobile version of the Fedex site automatically replaces hover menus with a simpler tap interface

As always good website design is about taking in to account your audience and how you can get them to the information they are looking for quickly and easily. It is worth spending time in the initial concept phase on these types of questions to avoid costly redesign and coding later on.  Need help with your site, want an objective review? Contact Enform today.

Web Design – A Humorous Look at Some Potential Pitfalls…

By | Blog, Comment, Mobile, Research, Web Design | No Comments

 

Inspired by Matthew Inman from The Oatmeal with his blog “How a web design goes straight to hell

Web design starts with the best intentions however sometimes personal taste can de-rail the process. At Enform we believe there can be a compromise between what the client wants and what the designer delivers.  But, most importantly focusing on what the user or usomer might want or need.

It is our role to inform our clients on current best practice and provide advice on what will and won’t work  – keeping in mind modern web design needs to:

  • Engage visitors – be visually appealing and easy to navigate
  • Relevance to what the visitor wants – within the first few seconds it should be obvious who you are and what you offer
  • Allow the above irrespective of device they use to access your site – mobile responsive

With all the best intentions in the world the process sometimes goes off track.

Matthew Inman, creator of The Oatmeal, once worked as a web designer. He is now a comic artist with considerable influence, and he compiled his experiences with difficult web design in a comic featured below.

In it, Inman describes the nine steps to the making of a web design disaster, and how clients unwittingly (or wittingly) cause it. We shortened those steps into four for you:

Step 1. All Is Well

Inman writes: “Everything is cool in the beginning.” It’s like the start of many relationships – the clients summarize their needs and the designer tells the client what to expect. If the clients have an existing web site for improvement, they show it to the designer, telling him or her that the previous designer was an idiot.

Toast_original

Step 2. The Initial Design

The designer shows the clients the initial design for comments and approval. Initial designs are expected to be further improved based on the clients’ input. To Inman, this is the high point of the whole process. Then everything goes downhill from there.

Toast_design

Step 3. The Client “Helps Out”

The client suggests his or her ideas for improvement. The designer complies. The client suggests more changes. They may even bring in other people to comment. These can happen several times in the web design process and indeed this step is normal in any collaboration. The result can be something both the client and the designer can be proud of. Or as is sometimes the case, the whole thing can turn into a proverbial “dogs breakfast” trying to satisfy too many different tastes, agendas resulting in a loss of clarity on key concept of the initial design.

Web Design - Some Potential Pitfalls

Step 4: The Design Fails

Intial Design VS Final Design

 

At this point, the designer may be having a nervous breakdown. Get another designer and repeat.

 

A mouse cursor controled by speaking

 

Takeaway

A lot of anguish could be avoided if clients, at the outset, treat a designer as an expert with valuable experiences and opinions that can help the clients achieve the needs of their web site. Designers should not be treated as mere helping hands or worse, just tools to do the clients’ bidding:

Too many cooks spoil the broth – especially when the cooks do not know how to cook.

The main point is this: respect designers as experts in their field. They know what works and what doesn’t. Sure, you could collaborate with the designer to create the best site ever but, if you don’t actually possess good design sense (and you must be honest enough to recognize this), do not hobble the designer with requests that are impossible.

Right at the start of the project, communicate your needs for the web site clearly to the designer. Usually, he or she will tell you if what you want is OK or not.

Whatever you do, always have mutual respect between you and the designer. It is a key ingredient to every successful design project.

At Enform we believe in delivering what a client wants but ensuring we advise and understand any implications that may affect our 3 initial key points on what a web design needs to achieve:

  • Engage visitors – be visually appealing and easy to navigate
  • Relevance to what the visitor wants – within the first few seconds it should be obvious who you are and what you offer
  • Allow the above irrespective of device they use to to access your site – mobile responsive

Contact us if you need advice on your design.

Email Accessibility: Making Sure Everyone Reads your Email Campaigns

By | Automailer, Blog, Comment, eDM, Research | No Comments

Email Accessiblity

Vision impairment and blindness are far more serious problems than you might think. It’s estimated that there are about 285 million people all over the world who suffering from blindness and visual impairment. In Australia, about 357,000 people report problems seeing even with eyeglasses and/or contact lenses. This is a topical issue with the current lawsuit against Coles.

As far as emails and web usage are concerned, these issues impede the efficacy of getting your message across. Fortunately, you can enhance the accessibility of your campaigns sent via Enform’s Automailer with a number of practices designed for the vision-impaired and users relying on screen reading devices, and audio prompts.

Below are some of the basic requirements for email messages to be considered accessible.

Use Descriptive Subject Line

Sounds easy enough, but you’ll be surprised to know how many campaigns out there have subject lines that aren’t descriptive enough. The subject line is what draws readers to open the email, so it should descriptive and concise.

This is even more important to people with vision impairments, who rely on subject lines to see whether emails are worth opening up or not.

Consistent Logical Reading Order

HTML email newsletters are typically coded with tables, the most reliable method of building layouts compatible across desktop, webmail, and mobile email platforms. However, these tables have to be planned and built carefully, taking into account users relying on keyboard-only access, who might not read the content in the order intended. For example, screen readers go through tabular content from either left to right or top to bottom.

Use Code to Indicate Headings

HTMLT heading tags <table>, <body>, <h1> and the like are critical to ensuring screen readers understand content hierarchy in email messages. Simply styling text by changing the font and increasing font size won’t work with assistive devices.  These visual cues have to be coded into the text for screen readers to understand them.

Provide Obvious Contrast Between Text and Background Colours

Users with vision problems or colour blindness are less sensitive to colour contrasts and luminosity when reading images and text on emails, so it’s important to differentiate text, images, and background with the right colours and contrast. Colours should be chosen not just for aesthetic reasons, but for accessibility too.

You can choose from a number of applications to test emails for contrast and help integrate non-colour based cues for everyone to understand your messages.

For Images, Be Sure to Offer Text Alternatives

Again, screen readers rely on code to relay content to vision impaired users, so images that serve an aesthetic purpose (i.e. preserving layout) should contain null alt attributes (alt=””) to signal they should be ignored.

However, images that should inform screen readers, like company logos, should have alt text to notify their meaning to screen readers. Example below.

<img src=”enformlogo.png” alt=”Enform Automailer” />

Incorporating these steps into your campaigns isn’t difficult at all, and simply means taking an extra step to expand the reach of your email messages. Give them a try and your campaigns may just reach more people.

Tips on Leveraging Social Proof to Get Subscribers & Customers

By | Blog, Research, Social Media | No Comments

social-proof

When was the last time you gave away your email address online? Was there any reluctance in handing it over?

Most internet users tend to protect their email addresses in fear of receiving too many promotional emails they’re not really interested in. Obviously, this is a problem for marketers who want to use email subscribers to grow their business.

But what if there was a way to beat this natural fear?

We believe the answer is social proof.

Social Proof in a Nutshell

Social proof is defined as a psychological phenomenon where people follow the actions of others in order to conform. In other words, it’s people doing things they see other people are doing.

The Wall Street Journal recently published a study aimed at understanding the effects of social proof in consumer behaviour. In it, researchers sought to find out whether social proof was a more powerful motivator than saving money or protecting the environment. They tested four different messages to convince respondents to use electric fans over air conditioning.

The first message told the customer they could save up to $54 a month on electricity.

The second message told the customer they could help save the environment by eliminating up to 262 pounds in greenhouse gases.

The third message tried to convince customers by reminding them saving energy was being social responsible.

The fourth message told customers that 77 percent of their neighbours were using fans to save energy.

As you may have guessed, the fourth message, the one that appealed to positive social proof, was most effective. In this instance, positive social proof proved to be more convincing than saving money, saving the environment, and being social responsible.

How do you use social proof in email marketing?

It’s doesn’t take much, to be honest; just use a simple reinterpretation of the examples by the study above.

1. Show proof of subscriber numbers

Showing the number of subscribers to your email list lets potential customers know that it’s common behaviour for other people to sign up, and more importantly, that it’s relatively safe. Simply adding a subscriber count mechanism to your opt-in forms allows you to tap into the desire of readers to do what others are doing, thus driving email subscribes.

You can also make your calls to action more relatable. Statements like, “Be part of a network of sales professionals 15,000 strong and growing receiving our weekly newsletter,” speaks to a reader’s impulse to join in on the action and see what he is missing out on.

2. Use testimonials from influential figures

If you’re lucky enough to have connections with influencers in your industry, then by all means, do everything you can to get a testimonial from them about your email list. These figures act as endorsers, reassuring readers that “Hey, you should sign up too!”

It’s one of the oldest tricks in the book. People want to look up to industry influencers because they want to achieve the same success.

How do you use social proof to increase email conversions?

With your email list already built thanks to social proof, you can then move to the next step: conversions. Fortunately, social proof can work here too, and again, all it takes is a little tweaking of the examples mentioned previously.

1. Show off your number of customers

Again, people want a sense of security knowing that other customers have already bought your product or paid for your service. When sending a product-related email encouraging people to purchase, include how many people have bought the same product or service and you’re bound to drive conversions.

The key here is to trigger a fear in missing out in an offer that others have signed up for or purchased. Part of it is curiosity, but a greater part of it is knowing that something, your product, must be worth paying for since many people have done so.

2. Highlight reviews

Reviews are perhaps the most influential factor in shaping a purchase decision, so you definitely want to leverage positive reviews of your products. Include positive, concise, but brief reviews of your products/services in newsletters, and you’re  guaranteed to see an increase in conversions sooner or later.

A Warning

Of course, all of these tips boil down to transparency. If you make things up just to leverage the advantages of social proof, you run the risk of things blowing up in your face, and your reputation forever tainted.

eBay Australia Rolls Out New Product Image Policy

By | Announcements, Blog, Comment, ecommerce, Research, Training, Web Design | No Comments

ebay-logo_raeume1

eBay Australia vendors should take note that beginning August 4, 2014, all new item listings, including those that are relisted without an image or has an image smaller than 500 pixels will be automatically blocked.

As most of eBay’s Australian Solution Partners already know, the online marketplace announced last year its plans to roll out a new image policy that would affect all product listings on eBay.com.au.

Since February 2014, the site had slowly put the new policy into effect across all listings. For those not completely aware of the change, or need a reminder on what to expect from the policy, here’s a quick refresher for you.

  • All item listings must feature at least one image.
  • Stock images can only be used on listings for brand new items/products, otherwise original photos should be taken of the item in its current state
  • All images must have a minimum image size of 500 pixels on the longest side. eBay recommends a size of 1600 for best results
  • Pictures must have no borders, text, or artwork – sometimes referred to as “graffiti”
  • Watermarks are allowed, but only for ownership and attribution purposes

ebay_image_size_requirements_2013_05_06

Graffiti, including text, borders, etc. won’t be blocked, for now, but eBay still recommends, and strongly at that, to feature graffiti-free images, as outlined in the company’s Picture Requirements.

Exemptions

However, there are exemptions to eBay’s new rule. The following categories are not included in the site’s image size requirements. These are:

  • Services
  • Books
  • Sub-categories within Collectibles & Memorabilia under Music and Movies

Why the change?

According to eBay, buyers have told them that the quality of product photos found on the site leaves a lot to be desired. And with the advent of mobile, and the fact that over half of all eBay.com.au visits come from mobile devices, image quality has taken high prominence in the mobile shopping experience.

Elements of a great listing photo

We at Enform recommend that our clients take note of the following tips for product images:

  • Don’t rely on direct flash lighting as this creates harsh and unpleasant shadows. Use off-camera lights, several of them, for an eye-pleasing look to your photos.
  • Use continuous lighting to minimise the effect of flaring and unpleasant reflections
  • For your lighting, lights with daylight or 5500k colour temperature work best for clear photos
  • Purchase or build your own softboxes for softer, more even lighting.
  • Clean white backdrops work best for product imagery and no graffiti
  • Square images work best on eBay, and are the safest option for mobile viewing
  • Use a photo editor, even a basic one, to enhance colour, contrast, and brightness, as well as to crop the image.
  • The item should take up as much space as possible on the image
  • Be sure to take multiple images of products from different angles, as well as close ups to reveal details and flaws, if any.

ebay advice

eBay’s recommendations aren’t hard to figure out, and should only benefit you and your listings’ chances of being sold on the site.

Are Facebook Pages Still Worth It In 2014?

By | Blog, Facebook, Research, Social Media, tools, Uncategorized, Webpage Monitoring | No Comments

image1 (3)

From occupying a dominant position just a few years ago, Facebook’s fan (business) pages have seen their ‘fan reach’ sink to an alarming low, leading to speculation of their impending demise. If you maintain your own business page, fan reach is defined as the percentage of your fans that see your post after its published on Facebook.

Fan reach falls drastically

From 2009 to 2010, Facebook’s fan reach on its business pages was at 20+ percent, with many pages enjoying record impression results. Since then, page administrators have seen severe drops in their fan reach, so much so that even with significant growth, it would take at least 2 years to recover. Here’s a brief timeline on the problem put together by Just Ask Kim.

  • 2 years ago: Fan reach falls to 16 percent, a reduction but not enough to worry about
  • 1 year ago: Fan reach falls yet again to 14 percent
  • 8 months ago: Fan reach drops to 12 percent
  • 4 months to present: Fan reach has dropped to an all time low of 9 percent, with several pages reporting lower impressions

Of course, the numbers above are simplifications meant to make the downward trend understandable. But, in any case, several marketers have been forced to rethink their strategies, in particular, just how much time and effort they should spend on their FB pages with the start of 2014.

Not all pages are equal

Facebook-paid-advertising

Yet despite the fatalistic attitudes of many online and social media marketers, a subset of Facebook pages have actually been spared from this shortfall in fan reach. Marketers who have allocated a stable budget for Facebook advertising and creating effective ads have not been affected as significantly. While fan reach has fallen across the board, the effects are less consequential because they have a funnel that capitalizes on their ad strategy.

In other words, those paying for ads on Facebook aren’t feeling the decrease in fan reach as much as the people relying on ‘free’ reach are.

 Cough up the money

Similar to how Google had shifted its attention to its paid advertisement system, Facebook is slowly making a compelling case for page owners to cough up the cash and protect themselves from dwindling fan reach. And if your plan is to do it on a long-term basis, you’ll have to come up with a strategy that funnels money out of your leads.

Facebook fan pages have gone from being a free way to market your brand on the world’s largest social network, to joining the ranks of paid media. Facebook is of course, well within its right to do this— and are using this to maximize their revenue.

It’s now up to marketers to respond to this paradigm shift.

No budget? Here’s what you can do.

Facebook-EdgeRank-Formula

Just Ask Kim has taken the liberty of outlining some measures you can take to improve your fan reach without having spend one cent.

  • Study the EdgeRank formula to figure out how Facebook rewards pages with more reach and what they ignore.
  • Use your fan list to your advantage. Use posts that encourage discussions among your fans to show signs of engagement on your page, which in turns increases EdgeRank, thereby letting more fans see your posts.

Do note that if you choose not to invest Facebook’s business pages for your brand, you’ll have to do more research and work. In any case, we here at Enform can help you achieve better results with your social media presence.