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Enform E-Commerce Integration

By | Announcements, Automotive, eBay, ecommerce, Google, Industry, Instagram, SEO, Social Media, tools, Web Store | No Comments

Enform Specialises in eCommerce

 

Enform enable Online Retailers to build and grow marketplaces, audiences and advertising reach. Utilising knowledge and experience we work with you to build a multi-channel, multi-market business that integrates with your systems to provide scalable options.

With each business utilising different systems to deliver pricing, inventory and rich content for their listings – virtually every integration is a bespoke development that needs proper planning and management to ensure economic and efficient delivery. Read More

Google Scraps Sidebar Ads, Adwords Rivalry Intensifies

By | Adwords, Google, SEO | No Comments

Google remains the world’s top search engine, and any change it imposes will substantially affect us and you, our clients, and all those who live and breathe digital marketing. February marked this year’s biggest Google modification – the unveiling of a new SERPs layout on desktops with significant consequences to digital marketers and Adwords clients worldwide.
In a nutshell, the changes are: Ads

  • No more text ads on the right rail of desktop search results
  • Four text ads instead of three to show above organic results
  • Three text ads to show below organic results
  • Text ads on SERPs goes down to seven from about eleven
  • Product listings and Knowledge Panels to show on right sidebar

What to expect from the changes?As we continue to gather and analyse available data concerning recent changes in desktop SERPs, we take note that the following are highly likely:
Read More

eBay Changes Listing Rules For Product Identifiers from 1st July

By | Announcements, Automotive, Blog, Comment, ecommerce, Research, SEO | No Comments

ebay_logo

eBay Australia is changing the listing rules for product identifiers in key categories including auto parts. 

As PARts Australia say – “Ignore it and you may pay a penalty in poor ranking. Embrace it and you may leap ahead of your competition.”

Increasing the accuracy of listing information is an important part of eBay ongoing work to improve the marketplace experience for all users.

That’s why, starting 30 June this year, all new listings of branded items in New and Manufacturer refurbished condition will be required to include product identifiers including the item’s brand, manufacturer part number (MPN), and global trade item numbers (GTINs) such as Universal Product Codes (UPCs) and International Standard Book Numbers (ISBNs) in select categories.

eBay uses these product identifiers to help buyers quickly find the items they’re looking for. When you’re selling, including these product identifiers not only has the potential to increase your items’ visibility in eBay search results and navigation, it can improve your placement in search engines like Google and Bing, too.

Read more about the eBay new policy and how important it is for eBay sellers and in particular, those selling branded auto parts.

MotoParts Dives into eBay with an E-commerce Solution

By | Automotive, Blog, Comment, ecommerce, Research, tools | No Comments

MotoParts on eBayRecognized as one of Australia’s top distributors of automotive parts and car accessories, MotoParts boasts of a colourful history in the B2B segment of the market, offering wholesale auto parts throughout NSW and Australia.

In an effort to leverage their current business model, the company decided to dive into a new sales channel, opening a new section of potential growth for the business. As one of the world’s largest marketplaces on the Internet, it made sense for the company to jumpstart their online presence on eBay, this according to MotoParts online director Scott Shillinglaw.

The Need for an E-commerce Solution

To launch a new online sales channel on eBay, MotoParts needed a comprehensive e-commerce solution capable of handling hundreds to thousands of product listings—a solution that could keep up with MotoParts surging online business.

According to Shillinglaw, MotoParts required a robust e-commerce solution that could help manage product feeds, with the additional feature of transforming product data and making it ready for eBay listing. Moreover, the solution had to mesh with the company’s ERP system, in particular, product, pricing, and inventory data, together with eBay and MotoParts’s e-commerce website.

The challenge with automotive parts suppliers is that the complexity and sheer volume of product parts information makes it difficult to find a working e-commerce solution—one that could withstand the impending massive increase in automobile models and corresponding parts within the next few years.

Shillinglaw said that MotoParts needed their e-commerce data to be in a coherent format, allowing their e-commerce managers to list products on eBay by part and vehicle compatibility, all in such a way that entices customers to make a purchase. If the product isn’t presented in a compelling manner, it won’t lead to sales, he adds.

A PARts Driven Solution

MotoParts turned to an e-commerce solution recommended by PARts, an online solution Enform is certified to provide.

With the new e-commerce solution, MotoParts was able to automate and integrate all their product data into one easy-to-access database, through a tool specifically designed for automotive parts content.

MotoParts can now manage and access their product data in one centralised solution, with orders placed on eBay extracted and standardized into a singular format—integrated with the company’s own ERP system. And you can read more about how MotoParts went online profitably with PARts.

MotoParts eBay Listing

Benefits

After just a few months of using the PARts-recommended e-commerce solution to open a new sales channel on eBay, MotoParts saw a surge in total revenue by at least 5 percent. The complete MotoParts e-commerce solution was also fully functional in just a few months. The company also saw a drastic reduction in resource time and IT expenditures.

But more importantly, the addition of a solid e-commerce solution into the company’s business foundation means they can now open as many online sales channels as they want, with very little work required.

You can read more about PARts and auto data opportunities here

Web Design – A Humorous Look at Some Potential Pitfalls…

By | Blog, Comment, Mobile, Research, Web Design | No Comments

 

Inspired by Matthew Inman from The Oatmeal with his blog “How a web design goes straight to hell

Web design starts with the best intentions however sometimes personal taste can de-rail the process. At Enform we believe there can be a compromise between what the client wants and what the designer delivers.  But, most importantly focusing on what the user or usomer might want or need.

It is our role to inform our clients on current best practice and provide advice on what will and won’t work  – keeping in mind modern web design needs to:

  • Engage visitors – be visually appealing and easy to navigate
  • Relevance to what the visitor wants – within the first few seconds it should be obvious who you are and what you offer
  • Allow the above irrespective of device they use to access your site – mobile responsive

With all the best intentions in the world the process sometimes goes off track.

Matthew Inman, creator of The Oatmeal, once worked as a web designer. He is now a comic artist with considerable influence, and he compiled his experiences with difficult web design in a comic featured below.

In it, Inman describes the nine steps to the making of a web design disaster, and how clients unwittingly (or wittingly) cause it. We shortened those steps into four for you:

Step 1. All Is Well

Inman writes: “Everything is cool in the beginning.” It’s like the start of many relationships – the clients summarize their needs and the designer tells the client what to expect. If the clients have an existing web site for improvement, they show it to the designer, telling him or her that the previous designer was an idiot.

Toast_original

Step 2. The Initial Design

The designer shows the clients the initial design for comments and approval. Initial designs are expected to be further improved based on the clients’ input. To Inman, this is the high point of the whole process. Then everything goes downhill from there.

Toast_design

Step 3. The Client “Helps Out”

The client suggests his or her ideas for improvement. The designer complies. The client suggests more changes. They may even bring in other people to comment. These can happen several times in the web design process and indeed this step is normal in any collaboration. The result can be something both the client and the designer can be proud of. Or as is sometimes the case, the whole thing can turn into a proverbial “dogs breakfast” trying to satisfy too many different tastes, agendas resulting in a loss of clarity on key concept of the initial design.

Web Design - Some Potential Pitfalls

Step 4: The Design Fails

Intial Design VS Final Design

 

At this point, the designer may be having a nervous breakdown. Get another designer and repeat.

 

A mouse cursor controled by speaking

 

Takeaway

A lot of anguish could be avoided if clients, at the outset, treat a designer as an expert with valuable experiences and opinions that can help the clients achieve the needs of their web site. Designers should not be treated as mere helping hands or worse, just tools to do the clients’ bidding:

Too many cooks spoil the broth – especially when the cooks do not know how to cook.

The main point is this: respect designers as experts in their field. They know what works and what doesn’t. Sure, you could collaborate with the designer to create the best site ever but, if you don’t actually possess good design sense (and you must be honest enough to recognize this), do not hobble the designer with requests that are impossible.

Right at the start of the project, communicate your needs for the web site clearly to the designer. Usually, he or she will tell you if what you want is OK or not.

Whatever you do, always have mutual respect between you and the designer. It is a key ingredient to every successful design project.

At Enform we believe in delivering what a client wants but ensuring we advise and understand any implications that may affect our 3 initial key points on what a web design needs to achieve:

  • Engage visitors – be visually appealing and easy to navigate
  • Relevance to what the visitor wants – within the first few seconds it should be obvious who you are and what you offer
  • Allow the above irrespective of device they use to to access your site – mobile responsive

Contact us if you need advice on your design.

A Breakdown of What Exactly Happens During an ‘Unsubscribe’

By | Automailer, Blog, ecommerce, eDM, Research, Social Media | No Comments

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In your email marketing campaigns, each message you send should come with a facility allowing readers to unsubscribe from receiving any future emails. Even if you don’t add an unsubscribe link yourself (which is a bad idea), one will automatically be added.

However, have you ever wondered just how exactly that link works? And more importantly, what happens to people who have unsubscribed, and is there a way to get them back? If you have multiple lists, how do you ensure that they only get unsubscribed from a particular list and not every list in your account?

Enform’s Automailer naturally comes with this functionality (an unsubscribe tag) whether it’s in the HTML page, template, or plain text version. Upon sending your campaign to your subscribers, each reader receives a copy of your email, with the tag automatically replaced with a unique link for each subscriber.

Each link is unique to each person and each email marketing campaign, so it’s not just a matter of copying an old unsubscribe and pasting it into your next email.

A Look at What Happens When a Subscriber Clicks on the Unsubscribe Link

Upon clicking the unsubscribe link, the user is directed to our Automailer system, which records the click and automatically recognises the subscriber and his/her corresponding email list and campaign.

Enform’s Automailer instantly unsubscribes users from your email list, with no need for you to manually change any settings on the program. Your campaign report will now show that user as having unsubscribed from receiving future emails.

The Suppression List – Ways to Manage Multiple Lists and Not Lose Subscribers

The default unsubscribe setting on our Automailer automatically removes an address from all listings in the same account. This means that if the unsubscribed address were in your ‘customers’ list and ‘newsletter’ list, it would be removed from both. We’ve also made steps to ensure that you don’t accidentally import an unsubscribed email address back into your account. Addresses that have unsubscribed from your campaign are immediately added to your suppression list.

However a unique feature of Automailer allows you to change your unsubscribe setting for your lists; this is extremely useful if you want the unsubscribe link to only remove users from the specific list their emails came from but leave them on other lists in your account. A great feature that ensures you don’t lose subscribers by a blanket suppression across all lists.

Once Unsubscribed, is a User Blocked Forever?

Former subscribers can re-subscribe at any time through your subscribe forms; only you are prevented from reimporting an address once it’s in the suppression list.

How do you Keep Users from Unsubscribing from your Lists?

There’s no foolproof way of keeping your database of subscribers 100% intact, but what you can do is make a compelling case for subscribers to stay, right at the unsubscribe page.

Take for instance, the unsubscribe page of Lazada.com, a major e-commerce player in Asia. Upon clicking the unsubscribe link, you’re presented with different options to better control the mail you receive.

better control the mail you receive

The options above are particularly useful for several subscribers annoyed with the flood of emails they’re getting, so giving them some kind of control over their messages increases the likelihood of them staying.

Tips on Leveraging Social Proof to Get Subscribers & Customers

By | Blog, Research, Social Media | No Comments

social-proof

When was the last time you gave away your email address online? Was there any reluctance in handing it over?

Most internet users tend to protect their email addresses in fear of receiving too many promotional emails they’re not really interested in. Obviously, this is a problem for marketers who want to use email subscribers to grow their business.

But what if there was a way to beat this natural fear?

We believe the answer is social proof.

Social Proof in a Nutshell

Social proof is defined as a psychological phenomenon where people follow the actions of others in order to conform. In other words, it’s people doing things they see other people are doing.

The Wall Street Journal recently published a study aimed at understanding the effects of social proof in consumer behaviour. In it, researchers sought to find out whether social proof was a more powerful motivator than saving money or protecting the environment. They tested four different messages to convince respondents to use electric fans over air conditioning.

The first message told the customer they could save up to $54 a month on electricity.

The second message told the customer they could help save the environment by eliminating up to 262 pounds in greenhouse gases.

The third message tried to convince customers by reminding them saving energy was being social responsible.

The fourth message told customers that 77 percent of their neighbours were using fans to save energy.

As you may have guessed, the fourth message, the one that appealed to positive social proof, was most effective. In this instance, positive social proof proved to be more convincing than saving money, saving the environment, and being social responsible.

How do you use social proof in email marketing?

It’s doesn’t take much, to be honest; just use a simple reinterpretation of the examples by the study above.

1. Show proof of subscriber numbers

Showing the number of subscribers to your email list lets potential customers know that it’s common behaviour for other people to sign up, and more importantly, that it’s relatively safe. Simply adding a subscriber count mechanism to your opt-in forms allows you to tap into the desire of readers to do what others are doing, thus driving email subscribes.

You can also make your calls to action more relatable. Statements like, “Be part of a network of sales professionals 15,000 strong and growing receiving our weekly newsletter,” speaks to a reader’s impulse to join in on the action and see what he is missing out on.

2. Use testimonials from influential figures

If you’re lucky enough to have connections with influencers in your industry, then by all means, do everything you can to get a testimonial from them about your email list. These figures act as endorsers, reassuring readers that “Hey, you should sign up too!”

It’s one of the oldest tricks in the book. People want to look up to industry influencers because they want to achieve the same success.

How do you use social proof to increase email conversions?

With your email list already built thanks to social proof, you can then move to the next step: conversions. Fortunately, social proof can work here too, and again, all it takes is a little tweaking of the examples mentioned previously.

1. Show off your number of customers

Again, people want a sense of security knowing that other customers have already bought your product or paid for your service. When sending a product-related email encouraging people to purchase, include how many people have bought the same product or service and you’re bound to drive conversions.

The key here is to trigger a fear in missing out in an offer that others have signed up for or purchased. Part of it is curiosity, but a greater part of it is knowing that something, your product, must be worth paying for since many people have done so.

2. Highlight reviews

Reviews are perhaps the most influential factor in shaping a purchase decision, so you definitely want to leverage positive reviews of your products. Include positive, concise, but brief reviews of your products/services in newsletters, and you’re  guaranteed to see an increase in conversions sooner or later.

A Warning

Of course, all of these tips boil down to transparency. If you make things up just to leverage the advantages of social proof, you run the risk of things blowing up in your face, and your reputation forever tainted.

Auto Parts Aftermarket Online, e-Commerce and all that PART 1: What’s it all about and why should I care?

By | Automotive, Blog, ecommerce, Research, Social Media, Uncategorized | No Comments

Reprinted from Undercar Review magazine – April 2014 issue 

By Jim Gurieff of PARts Australia www.partsdb.com.au

PART 1: What’s it all about and why should I care?

In 1997 the Australian new vehicle market was around 650,000 units and of that, Falcon and Commodore platforms accounted for over 200,000 or 30% of the total new cars sold.

Jump to 2013 and the number of new cars sold was over 1.13 million and of that, less than 70,000 were Commodore or Falcon based.

Meanwhile, the AAAA reports as part of its latest industry report – “Workshops and repairers crave an integrated vehicle and product fitment lookup with VIN and service data as part of a point-of-sale solution.”

With over 200 unique new models added to the Australian market in 2013 we now have one of the most diverse vehicle markets in the world spread over a relatively small volume base. With the demise of local manufacturing and an inevitable pure import market the industry has to adjust to knowing more about more vehicles at an increasing rate.

At the same time, the range of product available today is more diverse than ever before so accurate and timely service and product information is even more important.

Customers Looking For Outcomes

To add another layer of complexity, our customers are using the web more and more for product reviews, service information and price shopping for products and services while increasingly demanding of the way in which this information is provided. I want it now and when  it suits me.

So back to the question, why should I and the undercar industry care?

Because every industry needs to adapt to the changing environment and the connected digital world is accelerating the rate of change.

We are product and service providers and we need to remember that the end user customer or consumer is actually looking for outcomes and not just parts or service. They are most often driven by the need to repair a fault, pass registration, upgrade their vehicle or any number of other actual outcomes.

It’s rare that a vehicle owner wakes up one day and thinks that replacing their muffler would be a good thing to do that day. So when they do think about the problem, potential outcome and solution, all the industry players need to be ready to provide the answers and solution.

In simple terms, it’s about giving the customer what they want. A simple enough statement but not always considered by some in the aftermarket parts industry.

The following has been put together in conjunction with one of our digital and online specialist marketing partners, Enform Networks. This 2-part summary pulls together research, advice and case studies from various sources to help explain the current environment and the where the market might be headed.

The last few years have seen an explosion in online retail sales of auto parts. Major players like Amazon and eBay are enjoying  significant growth in many sectors of online retail sales and that clearly includes auto parts and related products. IBlSWorld reports a 13.3% annualised growth in Australian online automotive parts and accessories sales between 2008 to 2013 while US numbers are even stronger.

Clearly we are seeing a migration toward online fulfilment of retail consumer demand while trade and reseller purchases are moving toward closed user group solutions offered by the industry wholesalers and their business-to-business (B2B) portals. Many of the same wholesalers are also offering retail solutions to complement existing bricks-and-mortar or physical services with many more building virtual stores and online outlets that often exceed the service delivery offer available through their retail store fronts, try free shipping direct to the customer’s door!

Future projections are equally bullish with continuing double digit growth expected across all categories with reports specifically mentioning traditional “hard parts” categories including undercar brakes, shocks and suspension.

So it’s not just “S & G” lines (as the hard parts purists sometimes call accessories) but all manner of parts. This is an important misconception that poses one of the biggest threats to traditional parts sales and service thinking and is just one area of Significant risk to parts suppliers and sellers.

Along with our online specialist partners, we try to help our clients adapt to the changing nature of customer expectations and their channel preferences because after all, it’s about giving the customer what they want and also where they want it.

It’s natural to resist change. This applies to every level of the distribution chain and across all industries but some businesses are more resistant than others.

The area of data standards is particularly tough as suppliers and sellers struggle to defend and justify their own carefully cultivated data silos. Having worked in the aftermarket for a few decades, I’ve seen the changes to fitment cataloguing and product data creation and management.

Once the digital age picked up speed in the ’90s, we saw the beginning of the age of data-divergence as more and more suppliers and sellers built their own data solutions imagining that this would somehow provide a significant and durable commercial edge. In many cases it did and some of these are still working well however for many others, it proved to be a distraction and a costly diversion from the core business of making, selling and servicing parts.

Parts

After all, how many different versions of a Commodore VT 6 cylinder sedan data record do we really need?

The ’00s saw a maturing of the discreet data silo model as more and more sellers realised that having “another industry standard” that their suppliers would need to contribute to was actually working against them both in terms of cost and support. Meanwhile, the European parts suppliers created the Tee Doc industry standard (as one example) and the AAIA in the US launched the ACES/PIES system to help their industry.

The last few years have seen an acceleration towards standardisation with more and more suppliers and sellers adopting some sort of standard, a time of data-convergence. This is good news for both the industry and consumer and helps the aftermarket compete better while supporting the aims of programs like the AAAA Choice of Repairer campaign.Which leads us back to the real point and reason for the automotive parts aftermarket, selling more aftermarket products to auto parts consumers!

Online channels are not a silver bullet to rescue flagging sales. It’s a different way to market and requires different skills and resources and doesn’t suit all types of products. However, according to the National Australia Bank, the value of annualised online retail sales for the 12 months to end February 2013 was $13.1 billion or 5.9% of all retail spending with a year-on-year growth of 19%.

If you don’t have an online strategy or your strategy is not delivering that sort of growth rate, you’re falling behind. Embrace the opportunity and make sure you’re visible where your customers are.

Next time we’ll look at some practical ideas, suggestions and case studies to help you think about a strategy that suits you.

Google Analytics reports UX specialists should pay attention to

By | Blog, ecommerce, Research, SEO, tools, Web Design, Webpage Monitoring | No Comments

image1 (4)

Contrary to popular belief, Google Analytics doesn’t just provide information about website traffic, it also provides useful data to UX strategists, helping them set goals, and create strategies and concepts for a sound web design.

Of the 95 reports Google Analytics provides, a few offer incredible useful information ranging from how visitors interact with your website, where visitors came from, to the best channels to use for your goals. Ironically, Google Analytics suffers from a lack of web usability—it can be confusing to navigate your way through the service. Worse, finding which report can help you with your usability goals can be a nightmare.

Usability experts the Nielsen/Norman Group compiled a list of the Analytics reports you can turn to for UX applications.

Mobile Access Growth

This information is key when trying to figure out whether or not your site should also be friendly to mobile devices. How much should you invest in an adaptive web design? What kind of priority level should your mobile initiatives receive?

To compare the quantity of mobile traffic between two similar periods, say February 2014 against 2013, turn to Google Analytics’ date comparison feature, and combine it with some easy calculations offline.

Report: Audience Overview

  1. Go to Audience > Mobile > Overview
  2. Choose a date range, then add  comparison date range
  3. This report’s % Change line represents the change in percentage of absolute mobile visits for the specified date ranges. This is not the information you’re looking for, so ignore this
  4. To find the growth rate in percentage of mobile visits, perform a simple calculation by taking the number of mobile visits, dividing it with the number of total visits, finally calculating the rate of change.

Social Network Impact

Google Analytics also provides a useful report if you want to find out just how much your social network activities impact your goals, particularly when it comes to your content strategies (e.g. what content is shared most often and where it’s shared).

Report: Network Referral

  1. Go to Acquisition > Social > Network Referrals
  2. The report gives a detailed view on referral traffic coming from social networks. You can even click on the indicated networks to see which specific content people are sharing on that social channel.

Conversions

This report offers granular information on the way certain channels add to acquisition, how users originating from these channels act on your site, as well as how these channels contributed towards reaching your goals defined on Google Analytics.

Report: Goals Overview
1) Go to Conversions > Goals > Overview
2) Choose Source/Medium
3) Click on ‘View full report’

4) Upon reaching the full report screen, choose your ‘Source’ and then choose the goals you want to filter.

Number of Visits Prior to Conversion

When assessing and conceptualizing website usability, many UX teams like to build customer-journey maps designed for their target personas. These maps indicate interactions prospects are most likely to take before a conversion (before they become a customer).

Report: Path Length

  1. Conversions > Multi-channel funnels > Path length.
  2. Choose your desired goals to filter

The Path Length report provides a good idea on the number of visits to your websites before users convert or move on to other desirable actions (which you will define in your Analytics account).

Knowing the right reports to base your UX decisions of is the first step towards improving the usability of your website. Google Analytics is a powerful tool, so it is very important to know how to wield it.

The good, bad, and ugly e-commerce web design trends

By | Blog, ecommerce, Industry, Research, Web Design | No Comments

Web design trends are a double-edged sword. On one hand, using a trendy but well executed web design gives your visitors a new and better web experience. On the other hand, new designs simply add new features for the sake of having something new, instead of fixing old problems.

In the latest update to their E-Commerce UX report series, usability experts the Nielsen/Norman Group (NN/g) saw new web design improvements, but also spotted some bad design trends and even downright ugly concepts.

The Good – Larger Product Images

The jury’s still out on why larger product images are becoming more widespread across e-commerce sites, but whether it’s due to continually increasing screen resolutions and sizes, or visual designs that allow for more space, many sites are featuring large product images.

This of course, has allowed sites to show more product details, which is always a good thing for customers who naturally want to see more and as much of a product they like on a website. NN/g’s usability tests show that several users like to obtain additional details about a product from images, searching for things that may not have been included in the product description.

This also highlights the importance of using photos of the actual products in use or in context, instead of settling for stock images. NN/g’s tests found that based simply on product images, a user was able to tell if a toaster could fit bagels, while another was able to identify the feet on coasters that would protect wooden furniture.

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Coldwater Creek’s large product images give customers more details about their products.

The Ugly – Disorganized Customer Support

Many e-commerce designs exude minimalism, or a sense of space and openness, that is, until you go to the customer service section of the site. Unfortunately, many sites have failed to fix problems with their customer service/support sections, leaving them disorganized and hard to navigate through.

Common sense tells us that when a customer feels compelled to go to the customer support section of a site, it’s because of some problem or unanswered question. Naturally, a customer support page that fails to solve a customer’s problems only creates even more frustration.

You’re going to have problems when the areas of your site where you ask for payment are clean and easy to use, but the areas where customers can go to for help are a mess.

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Foot Locker’s customer service section, an unflattering wall of text.

When implementing design updates to your site, don’t forget to apply the similar changes to your customer service section. Keep things consistent with the rest of your site, and be sure that your FAQs are actually accurate and updated for questions that may accompany a redesigned website.

 The Bad – Shopping Carts

NN/g found that while several sites added small design quirks to their respective shopping cart systems, they still failed to provide enough feedback on whether a product has been added to the shopping car

It’s unfortunate that something so simple is so commonly ignored.

Don’t make your customers jump through hoops by scouring the page to see if they actually flagged an item for purchase or not. Neither do you want them to abandon the shopping process just to check if they added something to the cart. This kind of information needs to be immediately available and easy to find.

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And no, simply adding a short line of text beneath the “Add to cart” like Costco did on its site isn’t enough.

Showing shopping cart feedback on can be done in a variety of ways, whether through an overlay or modal, or an automatic redirect to the shopping cart (with a button to return to previous page). Nothing can spoil a shopping experience more than finding out you just bought multiples of the same product, or wasting 5 minutes navigating your way to the shopping cart.

To summarise, the do’s and don’ts of the current UX Trends:

Do’s:

  • Provide Larger, representative product images
  •  Create richer product information and show the product in its context

Don’ts:

  • Have inconsistent changes across your website. It’s important to update all sections, especially customer support and FAQs
  • Leave the customer hanging at the checkout. Provide solid feedback that an item has been added to their shopping cart, and make this easy to navigate.